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Welcome to the Isle Education Trust website. We hope that this site provides you with all the information you require regarding our Trust and that you will get a sense of the organisation we are and aspire to be. If you are interested in finding out more about Isle Education Trust please contact us.

  • South Axholme
  • Coritani
  • Epworth Primary

 

Art and Design

Key Stage 3

Students in Year seven cover various techniques and skills including drawing, painting, mixed media, 3d and printmaking and research and study the work of artists.

Work is based on different themes, these look at colour, portraits and the wider world. Independent learning activities and class work are assessed continually throughout the term and there is one major piece at the end of each term.

Year eight students are able to opt into Art and Design and have two lessons per week. Areas of study are based upon GCSE style questions and themes in preparation for the option process which begins in Year nine. Key areas studied include perspective drawing, collage, mixed media and the themes include Journeys, Pop Art, and the natural world along with the work of Rousseau. Work is continually assessed throughout the term and students are expected to produce at least one major piece of work for formal assessment at the end of each term.

GCSE Art, Craft and Design

Students receive one double and one single lesson per week and follow the AQA Art, Craft and Design course. Each of the four assessment objectives are equally weighted to obtain the final mark for all their coursework (unit 1) and their externally set task preparatory study and ten hour unaided focussed study (unit 2)

Students over the three years of the course produce a portfolio of artwork showing a full range of experiences from drawings, photographs, mixed media, printmaking, textiles, 3d and the study of various artists.

The assessment of unit 1 is continuous and students have regular feedback regarding the four areas of assessment and are given guidance to improve their portfolio.

The portfolio (unit 1) is worth 60% of the final level and the externally set task is worth 40%. The art work is assessed by staff and then a visiting moderator will view the sample selected and check that marking is in line with AQA standards.

The course would lead students to further study for example ‘A’ Level or onto courses or employment that require practical skills and artistic vision.

Business

Cambridge National Certificate in Enterprise and Marketing.

Level 1 and 2 for students aged 14-16, equivalent to a GCSE

This course is designed to fit into the new curriculum and offer the same size, rigor and performance points as GCSE’s. The Cambridge National provides a strong base for progression to further education and to our 6th Form to complete the Level 3 Cambridge Technical (A level equivalent).

How it is assessed.

The course is broken down into 3 units:-

Unit 1 - Examination 1 hour and 30 minutes (50% of total award – taken at the end of year 10)

Unit 2 & 3 Controlled Assessment (2x 25% of total award – done in year 9 and 11)

What you will learn

Unit 1 (externally assessed exam)

Marketing – research and segmentation

Finance – costs, revenue and break even

Product development – life cycle, differentiation and USP

External Factors – economics

Customer service - aftersales, pricing strategies, advertising and promotion

Business ownership – sole traders and PLC’s

Business planning – start your own business and functional areas

Unit 2 (Controlled Assessment – internally assessed)

Student will create and cost a business proposal. Student will undertake market research, present data and costings.

Unit 3 (Controlled Assessment – internally assessed)

Students will prepare and pitch their own business proposal that they studied in Unit 2. Furthermore, students will develop brand identity, promotion materials and ultimately pitch their product.

10 reasons to study business

  1. Lots of job opportunities:Business courses introduce you to marketing, human resources, accounting, ICT, customer care. Every organisation needs people who have these skills.
  2. Increases your confidence:Business courses are all about developing your interpersonal skills so that you feel more confident dealing with people in the workplace. We do this by involving you in hands-on activities such as group projects and fundraising.
  3. Prepares you for the modern office:You will learn how to use the most up-to-date ICT Microsoft packages. If you have great ICT skills you will be immediately effective in the workplace.
  4. Improves your communication:Business people need to be able to write reports, letters, and e-mails, deliver presentations or negotiate deals with customers. We also develop your listening skills and raise awareness of the importance of body language. Our employers tell us communication is one of the most important skills they look for in applicants.
  5. Become a great team player:It’s all about the team! In our collaborative learning environment you will learn to work as a team, how to get the best out of your team and discover what your role is in a team is.
  6. Learn to deliver exceptional customer service:For business success you need to understand your customer needs and deliver a service that exceeds their expectations. A business course will show you how to achieve this.
  7. You can exploit your creativity:Have you got good ideas? Are you innovative? Are you a detail orientated person? A business career gives you opportunities to make a real impact by tapping into your creative side.
  8. If you love a challenge:Employers need qualified business people who can help them solve problems and make decisions that will generate wealth for their business. If you are a hands-on person who likes to deal with practical – often tedious – problems that have to be overcome to keep a business functioning, then a business course might be for you!
  9. Because you are a people person!You like to talk, discuss, debate, negotiate but most of all feel your contribution is helping. “People buy people” so if you are good at interacting with people and enjoy the experience you will get the most out of a business course.
  10. Want to be self-employed?A business course can help you achieve the knowledge and skills you will need to manage your own business. Stop dreaming and start believing in yourself – you can make this happen!

Once qualified you will have a range of skills allowing you to work in various areas of a business including marketing, sales, customer service, HR, accounting, ICT and admin. The skills gained from studying the Cambridge National Course are numerous including the following;

  • Team building
  • Communication and soft skills
  • Analytical and critical thinking skills
  • Problem solving and decision making
  • Self-reliance, time management and multitasking skills

Combined Science

KS3 SCIENCE

The Key Stage 3 Science curriculum has been specifically designed to ensure students are ‘GCSE ready’ by the end of year 8. The topics and practical’s that are included as part of the curriculum, ensure students transition into year 9 equipped with the necessary foundation of scientific knowledge and practical skills.

The main topic areas that are studied as part of the Key Stage 3 Science curriculum include:

Forces

Electromagnets

Energy

Waves

Matter

Reactions

Earth

Organisms

Eco-systems

Genes

Each topic area studied is further sub-divided into 4 topics, with each topic having a specific set of concepts and keywords that students are expected to be able to understand and apply to a range of different contexts.

Assessment in Science across Key Stage 3 takes the form of ‘diagnostic assessments’. These are mini assessments, normally no longer than 30 minutes, given at the end of a topic. The diagnostic assessments are composed of a range of exam style questions and practical questions, used to allow the teacher to identify gaps in knowledge and understanding, which can then be closed following on from the assessment.

There are also 3 larger assessments planned into year 7 and year 8, taking place at the end of each term. These assessments will test a range of content and practical skills from across several topics.

Study in combined science provides the foundations for understanding the material world. Students will be taught essential aspects of the knowledge, methods, processes and uses of science. They will be helped to appreciate how the complex and diverse phenomena of the natural world can be described in terms of a small number of key ideas relating to the sciences which are both inter-linked, and are of universal application.

The key ideas which will be studied include:

  • the use of conceptual models and theories to make sense of the observed diversity of natural phenomena
  • the assumption that every effect has one or more cause
  • that change is driven by differences between different objects and systems when they interact
  • that many such interactions occur over a distance and over time without direct contact
  • that science progresses through a cycle of hypothesis, practical experimentation, observation, theory development and review • that quantitative analysis is a central element both of many theories and of scientific methods of inquiry.

Computing

By the end of this course, students will be able to use their knowledge and understanding of computer technology to become independent and discerning users of ICT, able to make informed decisions about its use, and aware of the implications of different technologies.

As well as developing an understanding of current and emerging technologies and how they work, students will apply creative and technical skills, knowledge and understanding of ICT in a range of contexts, including opportunities to:

  • Work collaboratively
  • Develop computer programs to solve problems
  • Acquire and apply knowledge, technical skills and an understanding of the use of algorithms to solve computer programming problems.
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of computer programs/solutions, their impact and issues relating to the use of computer technology in society.
  • Develop critical thinking, analysis and problem-solving skills through the study of computer programming.

Design and Technology

Key Stage 3

Students in Year 7 and Year 8 follow a mixture of food and resistant materials in module. These modules introduce students to the basic food and resistant materials techniques through a wide variety of practical tasks. The main focus is on developing a wide range of skills and knowledge required for GCSE and vocational awards, mostly through hands on making activities. Classes are taught using a variety of different approaches including individual and team work, discussions, individual projects, scientific experiments

The Year 7 curriculum currently includes topics focusing on…

  1. The Eatwell Guide and practical’s associated with the different sections,
  2. Basic Health and safety
  3. Designing and Making using a given design brief

The Year 8 curriculum currently includes topics focusing on…

  1. Afternoon tea – with a look at the history and including key skills in cake and pastry making,
  2. Food Around the World – including sustainability and Fair trade.
  3. Knowledge and Understanding of a wide range of materials in society leading onto the designing and making of a product

Assessment of work in Year 7 and Year 8 is based upon self, peer and teacher assessment of practical work and homework often in the style of flip learning and investigation. Assessment criteria is linked to the Assessment Objectives as set out in KS4 specifications

Engineering

Key Stage 3

Students in Year 7 and Year 8 follow a mixture of food and resistant materials in module. These modules introduce students to the basic food and resistant materials techniques through a wide variety of practical tasks. The main focus is on developing a wide range of skills and knowledge required for GCSE and vocational awards, mostly through hands on making activities. Classes are taught using a variety of different approaches including individual and team work, discussions, individual projects, scientific experiments

The Year 7 curriculum currently includes topics focusing on…

  1. The Eatwell Guide and practical’s associated with the different sections,
  2. Basic Health and safety
  3. Designing and Making using a given design brief

The Year 8 curriculum currently includes topics focusing on…

  1. Afternoon tea – with a look at the history and including key skills in cake and pastry making,
  2. Food Around the World – including sustainability and Fair trade.
  3. Knowledge and Understanding of a wide range of materials in society leading onto the designing and making of a product

Assessment of work in Year 7 and Year 8 is based upon self, peer and teacher assessment of practical work and homework often in the style of flip learning and investigation. Assessment criteria is linked to the Assessment Objectives as set out in KS4 specifications

WJEC Level 1 & 2 Engineering

WJEC Level 1/2 Awards in Engineering offer a learning experience that focuses learning for 14-16 year olds through applied learning, i.e. acquiring and applying knowledge, skills and understanding through purposeful tasks set in sector or subject contexts that have many of the characteristics of real work.

The qualification is built from discrete units, but allows for both synoptic learning and assessment. Each unit has an applied purpose which acts as a focus for the learning in the unit. The applied purpose is the vehicle through which the learning contained in the unit is made relevant and purposeful. It is also the means by which learners are enthused, engaged and motivated to study engineering. The applied purpose provides the opportunity for authentic work related learning, but more than this, it will require learners to consider how the use and application of their learning impacts on individuals, employers, society and the environment. The applied purpose will also enable learners to learn in such a way that they develop:

  • skills required for independent learning and development
  • a range of generic and transferable skills
  • the ability to solve problems
  • the skills of project based research, development and presentation
  • the fundamental ability to work alongside other professionals, in a professional environment
  • the ability to apply learning in vocational contexts.

The qualification structure is:

WJEC Level 1/2 Award in Engineering

Unit number

Unit title

Assessment

GLH

1

Engineering design

Internal

30

2

Producing engineering products

Internal

60

3

Solving engineering problems

External

30

 

Unit 1 (9791) Engineering Design and Unit 2 (9792) Producing Engineering Products

These two units are assessed through summative controlled assessment.

  • Each internally assessed unit must be assessed independently.
  • Learners may produce a piece of evidence that contributes to assessment criteria for more than one unit. This is acceptable provided it can be clearly attributed to a specified assessment criterion and has been produced under the appropriate controlled conditions for each unit.
  • Performance bands are provided for Level 1 Pass, Level 2 Pass, Level 2 Merit and Level 2 Distinction. Evidence must clearly show how the learner has met the standard for the higher grades.

Unit 3 (9793) Solving Engineering Problems

Solving Engineering Problems will be set and marked externally assessed.

90 minute examination;

  • Total of 60 marks;
  • Three questions on each paper;
  • Short and extended answer questions, based on stimulus material and applied contexts;
  • Each question will have an applied problem solving scenario;
  • One question will have a scenario from which a series of discrete, specific problems need to be addressed;
  • Each paper will have questions that address at least two of mechanical, electronic and structural engineering problems;
  • At least 10 marks will be awarded for demonstrating drawing skills;
  • Available in June of each year; • Learners are allowed one re-sit opportunity. The highest grade will contribute towards the overall grade for the qualification;
  • WJEC will produce a mark scheme which will be used as the basis for marking the examination papers;
  • Graded Level 1 Pass, Level 2 Pass, Level 2 Merit and Level 2 Distinction.

Summary of Assessment:

To achieve a full award the candidate must achieve all three. Unit 9791 Engineering Design and Unit 9792 Producing Engineering Products Both of these units are internally assessed under controlled conditions.

This overall course is graded as:

  • Level 1 Pass
  • Level 2 Pass
  • Level 2 Merit
  • Level 2 Distinction

Useful External links and Resources

WJEC Exam Board: Follow the link below to the WJEC website where the exam specification can be found. Also sample exam papers can be found on this site, and a series of useful power-point presentations show examples of the units covered in this exam series.

Textbooks

Pugh S (1991) Total Design Addison Wesley Publishers ISBN 9780201416398 Neil Phelps and Colin Simmons (2007) Revised Drawing Practice BS 8888:2006 3 rd Edition ISBN 978-0-580-50868-4 Dick Powell (1990) Presentation Techniques Little, Brown & CompanyISBN-13: 978- 0316912433 Koos Eissen, Roselien Steur (2007) Sketching: Drawing Techniques for Product Designers Bis Publishers ISBN-13: 978-9063691714

 

What can I do next?

The successful completion of this qualification, together with other equivalent qualifications, such as maths and sciences, could provide the learner with opportunities to access a range of qualifications including GCE, apprenticeships, vocationally related and occupational qualifications. These include:

  • GCEs in Physics or D and T
  • Diplomas in Engineering

Apprenticeships in Engineering

English Language

Key Stage 3:

From the very first day in Year 7 we are preparing our students for their GCSEs, English is very much a skills based subject and so we are continually revisiting vital components that students need to master.

Y7 to Y9 is specifically mapped to cover essential skills needed for the 4 exam papers they will sit at the end of Y11.

A sample of Y7 topics:

  • The Hunger Games. Through this text we explore plot, characterisation and themes – ideas that are at the heart of the Literature paper. We also look at writing skills, specifically descriptive writing, and how to construct effective sentences, use ambitious vocabulary and the appropriate use of figurative language.
  • Culture. Through this theme we look at comprehension skills and how writers use language to create mood and atmosphere, and explore implied meanings. We also use this theme to explore poetry and the effect of language.

A sample of Y8 topics:

  • Slam Jam Project. Through this competition we explore writing skills, they will experiment with a wide range of sentence structures and punctuation for deliberate purpose and effect, and develop crucial editing skills.
  • Isolation. Through this theme they will study ‘Of Mice and Men’ exploring characterisation and themes and respond to exam style questions. They will also read non-fiction texts and make comparisons.

 

A sample of Y9 topics:

  • Short stories. Through this topic they will explore how a writer has structured the text to engage a reader. They will also focus on how to evaluate texts.
  • Blood Brothers. In year 9 we introduce GCSE texts. Through this text they explore character motivation and debate key ideas that run through the text.

Assessment in Y7-9 is done termly and links directly to the skills we have been developing in class. As everything is directly focused on the skills required for GCSE, these assessments are GCSE style questions. Assessments take place in exam-like conditions in order to fully prepare students for the 100% exam.

GCSE English Language

English is a core subject and therefore is compulsory for all students. English is regarded as a qualification that students need for all walks of life, regardless of whether they intend to go to college or the workplace.

There are 3 components to English Language:

  1. Paper 1. Explorations in creative reading and writing.
  2. Paper 2. Writers’ viewpoints and perspectives.
  3. Spoken Language.

Paper 1. Explorations in creative reading and writing.

For this paper students are given one piece of fiction to read, and they are to use this to answer 4 questions which test their ability to retrieve, explain and analyse decisions the writer has made and critically evaluate.

They are also given a picture prompt and will be asked to write either a description or a narrative.

Paper 2. Writers’ viewpoints and perspectives.

For this paper students are given two pieces of non-fiction to read, they are to use this to answer 4 questions which test their ability to summarise, explain and analyse decisions the writer has made, and compare.

They are also given a topic statement and asked to give their viewpoint.

Spoken Language.

Students must prepare a 5 minute presentation on a topic of their choice. This will be assessed by their English teacher and then validated by an external assessor.

English Literature

Key Stage 3:

From the very first day in Year 7 we are preparing our students for their GCSEs, English is very much a skills based subject and so we are continually revisiting vital components that students need to master.

Y7 to Y9 is specifically mapped to cover essential skills needed for the 4 exam papers they will sit at the end of Y11.

A sample of Y7 topics:

  • The Hunger Games. Through this text we explore plot, characterisation and themes – ideas that are at the heart of the Literature paper. We also look at writing skills, specifically descriptive writing, and how to construct effective sentences, use ambitious vocabulary and the appropriate use of figurative language.
  • Culture. Through this theme we look at comprehension skills and how writers use language to create mood and atmosphere, and explore implied meanings. We also use this theme to explore poetry and the effect of language.

A sample of Y8 topics:

  • Slam Jam Project. Through this competition we explore writing skills, they will experiment with a wide range of sentence structures and punctuation for deliberate purpose and effect, and develop crucial editing skills.
  • Isolation. Through this theme they will study ‘Of Mice and Men’ exploring characterisation and themes and respond to exam style questions. They will also read non-fiction texts and make comparisons.

 

A sample of Y9 topics:

  • Short stories. Through this topic they will explore how a writer has structured the text to engage a reader. They will also focus on how to evaluate texts.
  • Blood Brothers. In year 9 we introduce GCSE texts. Through this text they explore character motivation and debate key ideas that run through the text.

Assessment in Y7-9 is done termly and links directly to the skills we have been developing in class. As everything is directly focused on the skills required for GCSE, these assessments are GCSE style questions. Assessments take place in exam-like conditions in order to fully prepare students for the 100% exam.

GCSE English Literature

Under the new framework, English Literature is now a compulsory GCSE that all students must take. English Literature is a highly respected GCSE due to the academic nature of the course.

There are 2 components to English Literature:

  1. Paper 1. Shakespeare and the 19th century novel.
  2. Paper 2. Modern Texts and Poetry.

Paper 1. Shakespeare and the 19th century novel.

Students will either study ‘Macbeth’ or ‘Romeo and Juliet’ and ‘A Christmas Carol.’ For both of these questions students will be given one question that will either focus on theme or characterisation and an extract to support. The exam is 1 hour and 45 minutes so their responses will be extended.

Paper 2. Modern Texts and Poetry.

The modern text they study will be either ‘An Inspector Calls’ or ‘Blood Brothers’. They will have a choice of question but no extract to support them. The poetry element of this exam is divided into 2 sessions: the poetry anthology and unseen poetry. The anthology consists of 15 pieces of poetry that students will analyse in lessons but the exam is closed book so they will not have the anthology to support them. The unseen poetry assesses their ability to analyse poetry that they haven’t been able to prepare.

The Literature exam is bigger than ever before, and there’s now a real focus on knowledge not just the application of skills. In order to support your child we suggest that you buy your own copies of the text so they can bring these each lesson and annotate in lesson. Furthermore there are some fantastic revision guides available which we would recommend you purchase at the start of Y10 so they can begin their revision from the start of the course.

Food

Key Stage 3

Students in Year 7 and Year 8 follow a mixture of food and resistant materials in module. These modules introduce students to the basic food and resistant materials techniques through a wide variety of practical tasks. The main focus is on developing a wide range of skills and knowledge required for GCSE and vocational awards, mostly through hands on making activities. Classes are taught using a variety of different approaches including individual and team work, discussions, individual projects, scientific experiments

The Year 7 curriculum currently includes topics focusing on…

  1. The Eatwell Guide and practical’s associated with the different sections,
  2. Basic Health and safety
  3. Designing and Making using a given design brief

The Year 8 curriculum currently includes topics focusing on…

  1. Afternoon tea – with a look at the history and including key skills in cake and pastry making,
  2. Food Around the World – including sustainability and Fair trade.
  3. Knowledge and Understanding of a wide range of materials in society leading onto the designing and making of a product

Assessment of work in Year 7 and Year 8 is based upon self, peer and teacher assessment of practical work and homework often in the style of flip learning and investigation. Assessment criteria is linked to the Assessment Objectives as set out in KS4 specifications

GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition

The WJEC GCSE in Food and Nutrition equips students with the knowledge, understanding and skills required to cook and apply the principles of food science, nutrition and healthy eating. It encourages students to cook, enables them to make informed decisions about food and nutrition and allows them to acquire knowledge in order to be able to feed themselves and others affordably and nutritiously, now and later in life.

Aims of the Course

By studying Food and Nutrition, students will be able to develop an understanding of:

  1. Cooking Skills - demonstrate effective and safe cooking skills by planning, preparing and cooking a variety of food commodities whilst using different cooking techniques and equipment.
  2. Scientific Knowledge - develop knowledge and understanding of the functional properties and chemical characteristics of food as well as a sound knowledge of the nutritional content of food and drinks.
  3. Healthy Eating - understand the relationship between diet, nutrition and health, including the physiological and psychological effects of poor diet and health.
  4. Economical Process - understand the economic, environmental, ethical and socio-cultural influences on food availability, production processes, diet and health choices.
  5. Sensory and Safety - demonstrate knowledge and understanding of functional and nutritional properties, sensory qualities and microbiological food safety considerations when preparing, processing, storing, cooking and serving food.
  6. The World of Food - understand and explore a range of ingredients and processes from different culinary traditions (traditional Welsh, British and international) to inspire new ideas or modify existing recipes.

Assessment

The final GCSE grade will be made up of the following:

1 - 50% Written exam – Summer Year 11

2 - 15% - Food Investigation task– October Year 11

3 - 35% - Food Preparation task – January Year 11

         Grades 9-1 awarded.

Component 1: Principles of Food Preparation and Nutrition Written examination:

1 hour 45 minutes 50% of qualification

This component will consist of two sections both containing compulsory questions and will assess the six areas of content:

  1. Food commodities
  2. Principles of nutrition
  3. Diet and good health
  4. The science of food
  5. Where food comes from
  6. Cooking and food preparation

Section A: questions based on stimulus material.

Section B: structured, short and extended response questions to assess content related to food preparation and nutrition.

Component 2: Food Preparation and Nutrition in Action Non-examination assessment

(50% of qualification) internally assessed, externally moderated.

Assessment 1: The Food Investigation Assessment 8 hours

A scientific food investigation which will assess the learner's knowledge, skills and understanding in relation to scientific principles underlying the preparation and cooking of food.

Assessment 2: 12 hours

The Food Preparation Assessment: Prepare, cook and present a menu which assesses the learner’s knowledge, skills and understanding in relation to the planning, preparation, cooking and presentation of food.

These assessments will be based on a choice of tasks released by WJEC annually.

Useful external Links

British Nutrition Foundation www.nutrition.org.uk/

This website contains a huge amount of information about nutrition which is ideal for GCSE

EDUQAS Exam Board www.eduqas.co.uk/qualifications/food-preparation-and-nutrition/

Follow this link to the EDUQAS website where the exam specification can be found. Also previous exam papers can be found on this site, and a series of useful videos, podcasts and on line activities

Food Fact of Life www.foodafactoflife.org.uk/

This is a free resource which offers modules and information on nutrition, ingredients & food science and many more. This website includes: PowerPoint activity sheets and are aimed at GCSE and A-Level students.

BBC Bitesize www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/design/foodtech/

This is a useful link for revision of key concepts learned through this course such as nutrition, functions of ingredients, food packaging and labelling and more. BBC Bite-size offers revision notes, activities and tests on these topics. Please note the Bite-Size website is not specifically for the EDUQAS exam specification.

Commodities websites meatandeducation.redmeatinfo.com www.seafish.org/

You tube channel https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL5JSZtMyV6ThLZiVgSoCoaRdBsDBORhxS

Child Care

The health and social care sector is vast and within this field there are a diverse range of career opportunities for care professionals. There are many different factors that affect the development of children. 

By studying this qualification you will gain a basic understanding of the stages and sequence of child development and stages of play. Additionally you will have an introduction to the influences that affect the holistic development of children, caring for children after birth, everyday equipment and nutritional guidelines that can support the development of children.

 Many of the topics covered are very relevant to people’s lives. The child development course is designed to give you the knowledge, understanding and competency needed when considering entering employment in the social care sector. It is designed to allow progression to further education or to follow careers in care related professions such as:

 • Nursery Assistant 

• Early Years Teacher 

• Nursery Nurse 

• Nanny 

• Classroom Support Worker 

• Health Visitor 

• Play Worker

Geography

Accordion conte

Key stage 3

Students in year 7 and 8 follow a varied curriculum. The topics will introduce students to a wide range of geographical issues to broaden their understanding of the world in which they live. This will allow them to develop skills that will be required at GCSE and A level. Classes will be taught using a variety of different approaches including group work, debates, role play and individual projects.

In year 7 the curriculum includes the following topics:

  1. Introduction to Geography
  2. Where do I live?
  3. Geography of Christmas
  4. Seven wonders and world mapping
  5. Weather and climate
  6. Crime
  7. Coasts

In year 8 the curriculum includes the following topics:

  1. Ecosystems fieldwork project
  2. Hazards
  3. Glaciation and cold environments
  4. Population
  5. Natural resources and sustainable energy
  6. Fashion and development.

Assessment will take place each half term. This will be in the form of a formal written assessment/project work and an end of unit test. Students will be presented with GCSE style questions, modelled from the final examinations taken in year 11. This is to allow students to become familiar with the format and skills required to be successful in year 11.

GCSE Geography

Students will develop many skills through the study of Geography; critical thinking, communication and organisation in particular. Students will develop skills in order to produce extended answers in order to make comparisons between case studies. As part of the course there will be several fieldwork opportunities to enable students to look at two contrasting environments, considering the human and physical interactions between them. The main areas of study will include the following:

Year 9

  1. Living world
  2. UK resources: energy
  3. UK Geography
  4. UK resources: water and food
  5. Coasts including fieldwork trip
  6. Development Gap

Year 10

  1. Urban issues and challenges including fieldwork trip
  2. Natural Hazards
  3. Resource management: energy

Year 11

  1. Rivers including fieldwork trip
  2. Changing economic world
  3. Pre-release preparation

GCSE Geography is a linear qualification and all assessment will take place at the end of Year 11. There is no coursework requirement and the final grade in the subject will be assessed by three externally marked examinations.

Paper 1 Living with the physical environment (1hr 30min 35% of the final mark)

Paper2 Challenges in the human environment (1hr 30min 35% of the final mark)

Paper 3 Geographical applications (1hr 15min 30% of the final mark)

GCSE Geography is highly valued by employers and universities. It demonstrates a wide variety of skills that are sought after in the work place. Future careers having taken GCSE Geography could include; environmental consultant, town planner, teacher, cartographer, planning and development surveyor, GIS officer.

 

Health and Social Care

KS4 Health and Social care information

At South Axholme, students study a BTEC Technical award at Level 2 in Health and Social care. The vocational course allows students to gain the knowledge, understanding and competency required when considering entering into employment in the health, social and child care profession. The course provides the platform to study Health and Social care in Higher education while also providing an insight into the role of health care professionals. Students interested in entering the nursing, midwifery, social care and child focused professions such as nursery nursing and primary school teacher would benefit from the courses content and delivery.

The course is completed over three years with the course specification spilt into 3 synoptic units:

  • Unit 1: Human lifespan and development 
  • Unit 2: Heath and Social care services and values
  • Unit 3: Health and Wellbeing

As the course is completed there is the opportunity to develop multiple study skills and learning independence through research, both in and out of school, group discussions and debates, observational skills of development and extended writing and referencing.

The course is assessed via two methods. Four internal assessed assignments are completed to demonstrate understanding in Units 1 and 2 – these are extended pieces of written work designed to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of key aspects of Health and Social care. Unit 3 is assessed in the form of an external exam. Completion of all 5 assessed tasks will result in students being awarded either a pass, merit or Distinction depending on individual outcomes and achievement.

All 5 assessed tasks need to be passed to succeed on the course.

History

Key Stage 3

Students in Year 7 and Year 8 follow a diverse curriculum focusing on different aspects of British and World History. These units introduce students to the historical skills required at GCSE and A-level, including cause & consequence, significance, change & continuity and differing interpretations of the past. Classes are taught using a variety of different approaches including group work, discussions, individual projects and historical re-enactments.

The Year 7 curriculum currently includes topics focusing on…

  1. The History of the Isle of Axholme
  2. The Titanic disaster
  3. The Romans
  4. Crime and Punishment Through Time

The Year 8 curriculum currently includes topics focusing on…

  1. Medicine Through Time c1250 - present
  2. Twentieth Century European History

Assessment of work in Year 7 and Year 8 is based upon GCSE style questions modelled on the formal examinations taken at the end of Key Stage 4. This will help students become familiar with the format and types of questions that they will encounter in Year 11. Every student will be expected to have produced at least one piece of work for formal assessment each half-term.

GCSE History

GCSE History involves examining past events and people, however the skills developed studying this course are transferable across many areas. Most issues in History do not have clear and easy explanations and by studying this subject, the ability to solve problems, extract accurate information and present well-reasoned arguments will all be developed. Study of GCSE History will provide a solid foundation for continued study of the subject at A-level, although the skills of analysis and writing extended answers will complement similar subjects such as Law, Politics, Geography and English.

Over the duration of Key Stage 4, students will study 40% British History with the remainder focusing on breadth and depth studies of World and European History. There is also a requirement that the course covers aspects of Medieval, Early-modern and Modern History.

The GCSE curriculum currently includes topics focusing on…

  1. Warfare Through Time c1250 – present
  2. Anglo-Saxon and Norman England
  3. The American West
  4. Weimar and Nazi Germany

GCSE History is a linear qualification and all assessment will take place at the end of Year 11. There is no coursework requirement and the final grade in the subject will be assessed by three externally marked examinations.

Paper 1: Warfare Through Time c1250 – present (1hr 15mins – 30% of the final mark)

Paper 2: American West/Anglo-Saxon and Norman England (1hr 45 mins – 40% of the final mark)

Paper 3: Weimar and Nazi Germany (1hr 20mins – 30% of the final mark)

GCSE History is viewed as a valuable qualification by employers and demonstrates the ability to think and work independently. A qualification in GCSE History is ideal for students pursuing careers in teaching, management, social work, journalism and the heritage and tourism industries.

Hospitality and Catering

WJEC Level 1 & 2 Hospitality and Catering

Aim

The WJEC Level 1/2 Award in Hospitality and Catering has been designed to support students in schools and colleges who want to learn about this vocational sector and the potential it can offer them for their careers or further study.

  • It is most suitable as a foundation for further study. This further study would provide students with the opportunity to develop a range of specialist and general skills that would support their progression to employment.
  • Employment in hospitality and catering can range from waiting staff, receptionists and catering assistants to chefs, hotel and bar managers and food technologists in food manufacturing.
  • All of these roles require further education and training either through apprenticeships or further and higher education.

Level 1 & 2 Hospitality and Catering Objectives

By studying Level 1 & 2 Hospitality and Catering students will be able to:

  • demonstrate effective and safe cooking skills by planning, preparing and cooking a variety of food commodities whilst using different cooking techniques and equipment
  • develop knowledge and understanding of the functional properties and chemical characteristics of food as well as a sound knowledge of the nutritional content of food and drinks
  • understand the relationship between diet, nutrition and health, including the physiological and psychological effects of poor diet and health
  • understand the economic, environmental, ethical and socio-cultural influences on food availability, production processes, diet and health choices
  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of functional and nutritional properties, sensory qualities and microbiological food safety considerations when preparing, processing, storing, cooking and serving food
  • understand and explore the Hospitality and Catering industry, the job roles and the different types of equipment use to support the industry.

Summary of Assessment

Unit 1: The Hospitality and Catering Industry

  • 40% (90 Marks) are thorough assessment by a (online) written examination – 1 hour 30mins

Unit 2: Hospitality and Catering in Action

  • 60% Non Examination assessment: internally assessed, externally moderated.
  • 9 hours which includes a 3hours practical exam.
  • Practical exam is a two dishes with accompaniments.

Content Overview UNIT 1 THE HOSPITALITY AND CATERING INDUSTRY

Areas of content:

  1. Understand the environment in which hospitality and catering providers operate Principles of nutrition
  2. Understand how hospitality and catering provisions operate.
  3. Provision meets health and safety requirements Cooking and food preparation.
  4. How food can cause ill health.
  5. The hospitality and catering provision to meet specific requirements

UNIT 2 HOSPITALITY AND CATERING IN ACTION

  • The applied purpose of the unit is for students to safely plan, prepare, cook and present nutritional dishes.
  • Propose four nutritional dishes for example The Western Deli and Coffee Shop
  • Plan for the production of two dishes that could be included on the menu
  • Prepare, cook and present the two dishes that the apprentice will prepare and cook.

This course is graded as

Level 1 Pass

Level 2 Pass

Level 2 Merit

Level 2 Distinction

What can I do next?

Teaching, Journalism, sports science, social work, environmental health, marketing, consumerisms, catering, product development, food science, nutrition, dietetics.

Mathematics

Mathematics Key Stage 3 and 4

Our passionate and experienced Mathematics team is committed to encouraging and inspiring the mathematicians of the future. Whilst we promote the use of technology, we believe that confidence in Mathematics must be built on the firm foundations of basic numeracy and algebra skills.

To this end, South Axholme Academy follows a 5 year scheme in Mathematics. In years 7 through to 9, students learn how to apply a formal set of techniques in order to solve both real-life and abstract problems. Students extend their range of mental and written calculation strategies and use efficient procedures to calculate with integers, fractions, decimals and percentages. They are provided with frequent opportunities for pupils to discuss their work, to develop reasoning and understanding, and to explain their strategies.

Students undertake activities that show how algebra, as an extension of number using symbols, gives precise form to mathematical relationships, formulae and calculations. They go on to use algebraic notation to describe patterns and sequences, solve equations, use formulae and construct graphs. Students use angle facts and properties of two and three-dimensional shapes in constructions and calculations moving onto to calculate lengths, areas and volumes including the use of circle formulae.

In statistical work, students progress from constructions and interpreting diagrammatic representations, calculating averages and spread of data to using increasingly sophisticated diagrammatic representations and making inferences from data they have collected. They work in groups to consider the application of mathematics in everyday situations.

Students’ overall progress is assessed on a termly basis and areas of weakness are identified and addressed through targeted improvement and reflection time in lesson. This information is passed on to parents and support is given for students to work independently on these areas also.

Our most able students are given the opportunity to take part in the UK Junior, Intermediate and Senior Mathematics Challenge, with considerable success.

The grades covered in each year, based on GCSE (9-1), are as follows:

At South Axholme Academy students are set by ability. Whilst we have many talented mathematicians, we realise that some students find the subject more challenging. In Year 10 students move on to studying a foundation or higher course in preparation for the final Year 11 GCSE exam. GCSE Mathematics is a linear qualification and all assessments will take place at the end of Year 11. There is no coursework requirement and the final grade in the subject will be assessed by three externally marked examinations:

Paper 1: Non calculator

Paper 2: Calculator

Paper 3: Calculator

All students are entered for EDEXCEL GCSE Mathematics 9-1 (1Ma1) and the most able of our students will also have the opportunity to prepare for a second qualification, The OCR Free Standing Mathematics Qualification ( Level 3 ). Each course has inbuilt opportunities to revisit prior learning and extend knowledge and skills from the firm foundations built in Years 7-9. There is also an increased focus on exam style techniques and problem solving to acknowledge the changes to the new GCSE assessments. Assessments are undertaken each half term using GCSE style papers giving students regular experience enabling them to build their confidence as they move towards the final assessment.

If you have any questions regarding mathematics at Key Stage 3 or 4 please contact Mr Forster,

pforster@southaxholme-iet.co.uk

Mathematics Key Stage 5

We have a well-qualified and experienced team of A level mathematics specialists who are passionate about sharing their subject with students who enjoy mathematics and who like a challenge and relish problem solving.

A level Mathematics is an interesting and challenging course which extends the methods learned at GCSE and includes important applications of mathematics, such as Statistics and Mechanics. It is highly regarded as an A level by both universities and employers.

The course is a new linear A level qualification (first teaching September 2017/ first examinations September 2019) studied over two years and is examined at the end of year 13 by three externally marked examinations.

Exam Board: AQA A Level Mathematics (7357)

Paper 1 : Pure Mathematics                                     ( 2hrs   33.3% of the final mark )

Paper 2 : Pure Mathematics and Mechanics         ( 2hrs   33.3% of the final mark)

Paper 3 : Pure Mathematics and Statistics             ( 2hrs   33.3% of the final mark)

Pure Mathematics

The course consists of a continuation of the grade 8/9 topics from GCSE including:

Trigonometry, Algebraic Fractions, Quadratic Equations, Vectors, Statistics, and Probability

In Year 12, new topics including:

  • Pure Mathematics, including proof, algebra, graphs, sequences, trigonometry, calculus, logarithms, and vectors
  • Statistics, including working with data from a sample to make inferences about a population, probability, using the binomial distribution as a model and statistical hypothesis testing
  • Mechanics, including kinematics, working with forces and Newton’s laws

In Year 13, we will build on topics from your first year of study in more detail, in addition to further topics from:

  • Pure Mathematics, such as functions, numerical methods, and differential equations
  • Statistics, such as the Normal Distribution
  • Mechanics, such as motion under gravity, friction, and simple moments.

We teach A Level Mathematics in small groups and utilise a variety of teaching methods including individual and group/paired work to address the complexities of the new A level; including the overarching themes of mathematical argument, language and proof, problem solving and mathematical modelling as well as encouraging the use of technology to facilitate these. We also offer additional support out of lessons.

Students’ progress is assessed regularly using Topic Tests, Past A Level Papers and questions. This information is shared with parents and support is given to students in making improvements via personal targets.

Our Entry Requirements are: Grade 7 at GCSE and recommendation from your Mathematics teacher.

Our Students say….

“Maths is an A level that is challenging respected and rewarding. It is tough sometimes, but the teachers help you to succeed.”

“To do Maths at A level you need to enjoy the kind of Maths you did at GCSE. Some of it is similar, but you move at a much faster pace. The questions make you think harder, as they don’t always tell you exactly what to do, like at GCSE.”

If you any further questions about A Level Mathematics please contact Mrs Kelsey, ekelsey@southaxholme-iet.co.uk

Music

KS3 Music

Students in Year 7 and Year 8 are provided with opportunities to develop their knowledge and understanding of musical language through the study, creation and performance of a wide variety of music with a strong emphasis on practical skills. Students are able to perform and compose in styles which suit their taste and experience which may include using music technology such as Sibelius software. Students can also build on the knowledge and skills they have gained through their experiences of music outside school.

Music has three elements – Performing, Composing and Listening. These are not just studied in isolation but complement each other.

The Year 7 curriculum includes topics which focus upon:

  • Timbre
  • Notation
  • The Human Voice
  • The Baroque Period
  • Music From Different Parts of the World
  • The Classical Period
  • Melody, Phrase, Steps and Leaps
  • Pulse, Rhythm and Metre
  • Contrast

The Year 8 curriculum includes topics which focus upon:

  • Melody, Phrase, Pulse, Rhythm, Metre and Silence
  • Music for Advertisements
  • Notation
  • Score Reading and Arrangement
  • Tonality
  • The Romantic Period
  • 20th Century Music
  • Texture
  • Primary Chords
  • 12 Bar Blues
  • Theme and Variation Form
  • Pop & Commercial Music

Assessment of work in Year 7 and Year 8 is based on Peer Assessment of compositions and performances. Work is assessed at the end of each topic which is approximately every four lessons.

GCSE AQA Music

The GCSE Music qualification is designed to motivate and stretch students of all abilities, equipping them with the skills and experience to succeed at GCSE and go on to further study.

Music technology is fully integrated and many areas of study have artists or composers who have written works in this format. Students can perform and compose using technology.

The qualification appreciates all styles and genres, skills and instruments, catering for different learning styles and musical tastes.

GCSE Music Assessments

This qualification is linear which means that students will sit all their exams and submit all their non-exam assessment at the end of the course.

Component 1 – Understanding Music

What’s assessed

  • Listening
  • Contextual Understanding

How it’s assessed

Exam paper with listening exercises and written questions using excerpts of music

Questions

Section A: Listening – unfamiliar music (68 marks)

Section B: Study pieces (28 marks)

The exam is 1 hour and 30 minutes

This component is worth 40% of GCSE marks (96 marks).

Component 2 – Performing music

What’s assessed

Music performance

How it’s assessed

As an instrumentalist and/or vocalist and/or via technology:

Performance 1: Solo performance (36 marks)

Performance 2: Ensemble performance (36 marks)

A minimum of four minutes of performance in total is required, of which a minimum of one minute must be the ensemble performance.

The component is 30% of GCSE marks (72 marks).

Performances must be completed in the year of certification.

Component 3 – Composing music

What’s assessed

Composition

How it’s assessed

Composition 1: Composition to a brief (36 marks)

Composition 2: Free composition (36 marks)

A minimum of three minutes of music in total is required.

This component is 30% of GCSE marks (72 marks).

A qualification in GCSE Music can lead to a career as a Music Producer, Club DJ, Rock Star, Singer (Vocalist), Song Writer, Record Producer, Music Therapist, Radio DJ, Music Director, Program Director, Session Musician, Conductor, Music Journalist, Booking Agent, Recording Engineer, Production Music, Artist & Repertoire Co-ordinator, Background Singer, Composer, Music Teacher. Further details on 100+ careers in music can be found at www.careersinmusic.com.

Performing Arts

Year 7: Performing Arts

In year 7 students will study 3 half terms of drama and three of dance so they can make an informed choice when opting in year 9.

At the end of each topic there is a formal assessment where students perform their final piece of work and it is assessed against the SAX drama & dance levels 1-9.

Peer/ self/ teacher verbal feedback takes place in every lesson.

Term 1A: Drama is Serious Fun – an introduction to drama skills*

*A baseline assessment in the form of a short performance takes place in lesson 3.

Term 1B: Sport Dance – an introduction to dance through sport (Plus two lessons on Christmas scripts at the end of term)

Term 2A: Theseus and the Minotaur – a scheme of work which introduces this greek myth and further dramatic conventions

Term 2A: Dance from Around the World – six different styles from six different countries

Term 3A: Working with scripts – an introduction to various styles of script based around the theme of adverts

Term 3B: Personal Projects – a group topic where students devise, write and perform their own piece of drama under the theme ‘Children’s literature’. 

Year 8: Drama

Students experience a wide variety of skills typical of what they will learn should they opt for Drama as one of their examination courses in Year 9.

At the end of each topic there is a formal assessment where students perform their final piece of work and it is assessed against the SAX drama levels 1-9.

Peer/ self/ teacher verbal feedback take place in every lesson.

Term 1A: Fault* – a scheme of work which introduces this duologue, using it as stimulus for drama and revising/ introducing further dramatic conventions

*A baseline assessment in the form of a short performance takes place in week 3.

Term 1B: Christmas Movies Project - a group topic where students recreate and perform a festive film of their choice in 10 minutes. They have to plan, devise, write and perform this piece.

Term 2A: Bugsy Malone: Musical Theatre – an introduction to this genre via learning and performing scenes and dances from the show.

Term 2B: Greek Theatre – an introduction to this genre with a focus on chorus work and two contrasting Greek myths.

Term 3A: Melodrama - an introduction to this genre with a focus on stock characters, melodramatic plot and scripts.

Term 3B: Component 3 mock exam. This is an introduction to the style of exam in the BTEC Tech Award in Performing Arts. Students work in groups to create and perform a piece of either dance or acting under a given theme: Destiny.

Pearson BTEC Level 1/Level 2 Tech Award in Performing Arts Course Outline

Who is the qualification for?

The Pearson BTEC Level 1/Level 2 Tech Award in Performing Arts (Qualification Number: 603/0406/6), is for learners who wish to acquire technical skills through vocational contexts by studying acting, dance or musical theatre as part of their Key Stage 4 learning.

The qualification recognises the value of learning skills, knowledge and vocational attributes to complement GCSEs. The qualification will broaden the learner’s experience and understanding of the varied progression options available to them.

What does the qualification cover? The Award gives learners the opportunity to develop sector-specific knowledge and skills in a practical learning environment. The main focus is on four areas of equal importance, which cover the:

  • development of key skills that prove learners’ aptitude in performing arts, such as reproducing repertoire or responding to stimulus
  • process that underpins effective ways of working in the performing arts, such as development of ideas, rehearsal and performance
  • attitudes that are considered most important in the performing arts, including personal management and communication
  • knowledge that underpins effective use of skills, processes and attitudes in the sector, such as roles, responsibilities, performance disciplines and styles.

This Award complements the learning in other GCSE programmes such as GCSE Drama and GCSE Dance by broadening experience and skills participation in different types of performance activities, with the opportunity to apply knowledge and skills practically, through project work such as developing ideas and performing for specific audiences.

Link to the specification:

http://qualifications.pearson.com/content/dam/pdf/btec-tec-awards/performing-arts/2017/specification-and-sample-assessments/BTEC-L1-L2-AWD-PA-SPEC.pdf

Pages 15 - 22 refers to the content and assessment of component 1. Pages 23- 26 have definitions and examples in reaching assessment decision for level 1 & 2 pass/ merit/ distinction.

Pages 27 – 33 refers to the content and assessment of component 2. Pages 34- 39 have definitions and examples in reaching assessment decision for level 1 & 2 pass/ merit/ distinction.

Pages 41 – 45 refers to the content and assessment of component 3.

What can the qualification lead to?

Job options

Jobs directly related to your degree include:

Jobs where your degree would be useful include:

Remember that many employers accept applications from graduates with any degree subject, so don't restrict your thinking to the jobs listed here.

BTEC Tech Award in Performing Arts: ACTING      

This is a brand new course which began this academic year therefore only year 9 drama study it. Year 10 and 11 drama classes are on a legacy specification (VCERT Level 2 Creative Studies: Performance Skills) which ends this academic year.

Year 9

This is an introductory year to the course where students will get experience of what is expected for all 3 components.

At the end of each topic there is a formal assessment of both their practical and theory work based on the relevant assessment criteria taken from the specification. Students receive formal written feedback for each.

Peer/ self/ teacher verbal feedback take place in every lesson.

Term 1A: Improvisation skills – this introduces students into various methods for improvisation and stimuli for drama. Students complete a skills logbook to go alongside their practical learning as homework.

*A baseline assessment in the form of a short performance takes place in week 3.

Term 1B: Dramatic conventions through Pantomime – this builds on and extends students’ knowledge of different dramatic conventions as well as introducing the genre of pantomime. Students complete a portfolio of evidence in the form of a skills logbook and research into the Performing Arts industry.

Term 2A: Duologues & Monologues – this topic introduces students to the theatre practitioner Stanislavski and his method for acting as well as learning, performing and eventually writing their own monologues and duologues. Students complete a portfolio of evidence in the form of a skills logbook and research into the play texts studied and Stanislavski himself.

Term 2B: Genres – this is a whistle stop tour of a variety of theatrical genres where students get to learn, perform and devise practical work in each style which demonstrates their understanding of each. Students complete a portfolio of evidence in the form of a skills logbook and research into the genres studied and key practitioners from each genre.

Term 3A: Theatre in Education – this is an introduction to this genre and students get to devise, rehearse and perform work in this style and then create their own piece of Theatre in Education to be performed to other students.

All topics have elements from component 1, 2 & 3 built into them.

Term 3B: Component 3 mock exam - This is an introduction to the style of exam in the BTEC Tech Award in Performing Arts. Students work in groups to create and perform a piece of acting using one of the questions from that academic year’s exam paper (2017/2018 academic year uses this exam paper)

BTEC Tech Award in Performing Arts: DANCE       

This is a brand new course which began this academic year therefore only year 9 and year 10 dance study it. Year 11 Dance are on a legacy specification (BTEC Level 2 First Award in Performing Arts) which ends this academic year.

Year 9

This is an introductory year to the course where students will get experience of what is expected for all 3 components.

At the end of each topic there is a formal assessment of both their practical and theory work based on the relevant assessment criteria taken from the specification. Students receive formal written feedback for each.

Peer/ self/ teacher verbal feedback take place in every lesson.

Term 1A: Introductory skills and back to basics - all they need to know about actions, space, dynamics and relationships

Term 1B: Bintley and Still Life at the Penguin Cafe: an introduction to the work, learning the repertoire, analysing key roles and responsibilities and creating their own piece based on the issues of the piece.

Term 2A: Bruce and Swansong: an introduction to the work, learning the repertoire, analysing key roles and responsibilities and creating their own piece based on the issues of the piece.

Term 2B: The Royal Family - 3 pieces from their repertoire: an introduction to their style and works, learning the repertoire, analysing key roles and responsibilities and creating their own piece based on the issues of the piece.

All topics have elements from component 1, 2 & 3 built into them.

Term 3A: An introduction to component 3: how to answer the exam question.

Term 3B: Component 3 mock exam. This is an introduction to the style of exam in the BTEC Tech Award in Performing Arts. Students work in groups to create and perform a piece of dance using one of the questions from that academic year’s exam paper (2017/2018 academic year uses this exam paper)

Year 10

Please see the attached documents – the year plan, assignment brief and the introductory powerpoint.

Here are links to the professional works

Boy Blue

http://www.boyblueent.com/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZsALq261qa0&t=93s

http://breakinconvention.com/artists/boy-blue-entertainment-uk

https://boyblueentertainment.bandcamp.com/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZsALq261qa0

 

Bob Fosse

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7uIPkwCYxKU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SAWjarAHHKQ

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mcrZIK3gqbU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AWFW02Yx-mM

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0002080/

 

Motionhouse

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ZO5homZ1d8&t=131s

http://www.motionhouse.co.uk/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wsy0ItTxTzg

BTEC Level 2 First Award in Performing Arts: Dance

Year 11

This is the last year of this course as the new BTEC Tech Award takes its place therefore only year 11 dancers study it.

Rationale for the Pearson BTEC Level 1/Level 2 First Award in Performing Arts

The Pearson BTEC Level 1/Level 2 First Award in Performing Arts has been designed primarily for young people aged 14 to 19 who may wish to explore a vocational route throughout Key Stage 4, but it is also suitable for other learners who want a vocationally focused introduction to this area of study. It has been developed to:

  • encourage personal development through practical participation and performance in a range of performing arts disciplines
  • give learners a wider understanding and appreciation of performing arts through defined pathways
  • provide education and training for performing arts employees
  • give opportunities for performing arts employees to achieve a nationally recognised level 1 or level 2 vocationally specific qualification
  • give full-time learners the opportunity to progress to other vocational qualifications, such as BTEC Nationals, specifically the Pearson BTEC Level 3 in Performing Arts (QCF), and, in due course, to progress to employment in the performing arts sector
  • give full-time learners the opportunity to progress to general qualifications, such as the Pearson GCE in Drama and Theatre Studies
  • give learners the opportunity to develop a range of skills, techniques and personal attributes essential for successful performance in working life. The Pearson BTEC Level 1/Level 2 First Award in Performing Arts has been designed to provide an engaging and stimulating introduction to the world of performing arts.

The qualification builds on learning from Key Stage 3 for those who may wish to explore a vocational route throughout Key Stage 4. It also provides a good introduction to performing arts for learners in post-16 education, ensuring that every learner taking the qualification completes it with a level of understanding and skill on which to build at a later date.

This Award offers a choice of pathways for learners designed to provide programmes of study to suit individual needs. Pathways that are available are:

  • BTEC First Award in Performing Arts (Acting)
  • BTEC First Award in Performing Arts (Dance)
  • BTEC First Award in Performing Arts (Production)
  • BTEC First Award in Performing Arts (Musical Theatre)
  • BTEC First Award in Performing Arts (Music Performance)

The qualification provides opportunities for learners to focus on the development of personal, learning and thinking skills, and English and mathematics knowledge and skills, in a performing arts context. Employers value employees who are able to communicate effectively both verbally and using electronic communication methods. The qualification also provides opportunities for learners to develop their communication skills as they progress through the course. This can be achieved through presentations and in discussions where they have the opportunity to express their opinions.

From the knowledge and skills developed in this qualification learners may expect, in due course, to seek employment at a junior level working with companies in the performing arts and related sectors in a range of roles, including performing in its various forms; stage management, production and set design; and related administration and technical roles.

Assessment approach

The Pearson BTEC Level 1/Level 2 First Award in Performing Arts includes an externally assessed unit in the core to introduce externality into vocational programmes of study. This will assist learners as they progress either into higher levels of vocational learning, or to academic qualifications such as GCEs and GCSEs.

The assessment approach for the internally assessed units in the qualification structure enables learners to receive feedback on their progress throughout the course as they provide evidence towards meeting the unit assessment criteria. Evidence for assessment may be generated through a range of activities, including workplace assessment, role play, practical performance and verbal presentations.

Locally available vocational examples and the opportunity to localise assignments to fit learner experience provides for a more realistic and motivating basis for learning and can start to ensure learning serves the needs of local areas.

Learners should be encouraged to take responsibility for their own learning and achievement, taking account of the industry standards for behaviour and performance.

Progression opportunities

The Pearson BTEC Level 1/Level 2 First Award in Performing Arts provides a good foundation for learners in post-16 education. The qualification provides a suitable foundation for further study within the sector through progression on to qualifications, such as BTEC Nationals, specifically the Pearson BTEC Level 3 in Performing Arts.

Alternatively, the underpinning knowledge, practical and vocational skills learnt on the BTEC Level 1/Level 2 First Award in Performing Arts will enhance and support progression to a competency-based course. Successful learners at level 2 may also consider general qualifications at level 3 such as GCE AS or A Levels in Drama and Theatre Studies and Performing Arts.

Learners who achieve the qualification at level 1 may progress to level 2 or consider progression to general qualifications such as GCSE Drama.

See attached year plan, assignment briefs

Links to spec

https://qualifications.pearson.com/content/dam/pdf/BTEC-Firsts/Performing-Arts/2012/Specification-and-sample-assessments/9781446936344_BTECFIRST_L12_AWD_PA_Iss3.pdf

Pgs 51-56 – all info on unit 1

Pgs 57-69 – all info on unit 2

Pgs 79-89 – all info on unit 4

VCERT Level 2 in Creative Studies: Performance Skills

This qualification is designed for learners who may be interested in the performance industry. The focus of the qualification is on the learner’s ability and desire to perform. This qualification aims to:

  • Focus on an applied study of the performance skills industry
  • Offer breadth and depth of study, incorporating a significant core of knowledge and theoretical content with broad-ranging applicability
  • Provide opportunities to acquire a number of practical and technical skills.

The objectives of this qualification are to help learners to:

  • Acquire and develop fundamental practical skills
  • Focus on performance ability by developing critical awareness
  • Provide an opportunity to develop existing skills relating to the performance industry.

Students will study the following 3 units:

Pupils who achieve this qualification could move onto further Level 2 or 3 qualifications, A levels and GCSEs:

  • Level 3 qualifications (including Advanced GCE) in Performing Arts related subjects
  • NCFE Level 3 Awards in Employability Skills
  • AQA Level 2 GCSE in Performing Arts
  • WJEC Level 2 GCSE in Performing Arts

It may also be useful to those studying qualifications in the following sectors:

  • Theatre
  • Set design.

Year 10 Drama & Dance

Term 1A & B – Unit 1 Performance Skills: This unit provides an opportunity for learners to assess the skills required for their chosen art form and explore the benefits and practicalities of skills development. Learners will understand the importance of rehearsals in the development of their skills.

Term 2A & B – Unit 3 External Exam: This unit develops the learner’s understanding of the practical and organisational processes that surround the successful staging of a performance. It develops an understanding of the co-operative nature of a production team and enables the learner to get involved in the development process

Term 3A & B – Unit 2 Production in Performance: This unit develops the understanding and effectiveness of preparing for, taking part in and evaluating a performance, taking into consideration the needs of the audience.

Year 11 Drama

Term 1A & B – Unit 3 External Exam: This unit develops the learner’s understanding of the practical and organisational processes that surround the successful staging of a performance. It develops an understanding of the co-operative nature of a production team and enables the learner to get involved in the development process

Term 2A & B - Unit 1 Performance Skills: This unit provides an opportunity for learners to assess the skills required for their chosen art form and explore the benefits and practicalities of skills development. Learners will understand the importance of rehearsals in the development of their skills.

Term 3A – Unit 2 Production in Performance – revise and complete: This unit develops the understanding and effectiveness of preparing for, taking part in and evaluating a performance, taking into consideration the needs of the audience.

Physical Education

Physical Education at South Axholme Academy

  1. Major areas studied in Years 7 & 8

All students study a diverse range of practical activities including some of the following, football, rugby (boys), netball (girls), table tennis, badminton, health and fitness, hockey, rounders, athletics, tennis, and handball.

There are also many opportunities to develop skills in leadership, coaching, and officiating.

Students also work at developing inter personal skills such as communication, team work and problem solving.

All students also complete three theory topics which will help underpin their knowledge and understanding should students wish to study the subject further at key stage 4.

  1. What form of assessment takes place in KS3 and how regularly?

All students are assessed in the practical activity studied each half term and receive an assessment score of between 1-9. Students’ top two practical performing activities make up their practical profile which contributes to 30% of the overall score.

In addition to this, the theory units make up the remainder of the 70% PE at key stage 3 score. This reflects the academic nature of the course studied at key stage 4 as well as rewarding the practical ability and high importance of the subject.

  1. The benefits of studying the subject at KS4- what might it lead to?

Vocations closely linked to Physical Education include, teacher, physiotherapist, fire fighter, police, army, personal trainer, leisure management, sports science, sports administrator, events manager and nutritionist.

Please see our Instagram PE page here.

 

Religious Education

Key Stage 3

Students in year 7 will follow a rich and diverse curriculum focusing on different religions as well as their impact on 21st century life. The topics covered will encourage skills useful at GCSE level, such as: considering different viewpoints, using quotes/ teachings to support arguments made, application of different examples and being analytical. Students will be taught using various activities from debates and discussions to challenge tasks and written activities. Students are active in their learning with high expectations set.

The year 7 curriculum includes topics such as:-facts vs. beliefs, places of worship, religion vs. science, creation stories and expression of belief.

Students will have the option to choose RE in year 8 where topics include: inspirational people, prejudice, human rights, the life of Jesus, Buddhism plus many more! Application of religious views (as well as non-religious) to a range of topics from animal rights to crime are also encouraged in year 8 where students learn how to develop arguments further.

GCSE

Students will further develop the skills achieved in Key Stage 3 and are encouraged to apply their knowledge to an array of different settings e.g. recent events, topics and scenarios. There is further encouragement to reflect on various viewpoints and opportunities to contribute opinions on thought provoking issues. Students will develop their own attitudes on a range of ethical and philosophical issues as well as being analytical when considering information presented. In addition, there are opportunities to ask questions and talk to external visitors, such as the police and guide dog trainers. In year 10 students also have the chance to visit the gurdwara.

RE is a linear qualification and all assessments will take place at the end of year 11. There is no coursework requirement and the final grade is assessed by two externally marked exams (each lasting 1hr 45minutes and being of equal 50% weight towards the final grade):

Paper one: Christianity and Sikhism.

Paper two: Themes-family/relationships, life issues, crime & punishment and human rights.

Spanish

Key Stage 3

Students in Year 7 are introduced to the basics of the language and begin to appreciate how Spanish is formed. Even at this stage students are introduced to the skills they will need to perfect in preparation for their GCSE. They are taught how to listen, read, write and speak in Spanish using a variety of approaches, encouraging independent learning, team work, problem solving and communication skills and being able to manipulate the language for their own use.

The Year 7 curriculum currently includes topics focusing on

  1. Introducing yourself
  2. School
  3. Family
  4. Describing where you live

The Year 8 curriculum currently includes topics focusing on

  1. Describing town
  2. Hobbies and free time
  3. Food and Restaurant
  4. Reporting illness

At the end of each topic a more formal style assessment is given in Listening, Reading, Writing and Speaking skills, and mirrors GCSE Assessment. The aim is to prepare students for their eventual GCSE in Year 11.  

GCSE Spanish

GCSE Spanish is designed to enable the student to communicate in Spanish. During the course students develop the following skills

  • Listening – to understand and respond to spoken language
  • Speaking – to communicate and interact in speech
  • Reading – to understand and respond to written language
  • Writing – to communicate in writing

GCSE Spanish is divided into 3 themes, and the themes are subdivided into the following topics.

Theme 1: Identity and culture

Topics: Me, my family and friends, technology in everyday life, free-time activities, and customs and festivals in Spanish-speaking countries/communities.

Theme 2: Local, national, international and global areas of interest

Topics: Home, town and neighbourhood, social issues, global issues and travel and tourism.

Theme 3: Current and future study and employment

Topics: My studies, life at school/college, education post-16, jobs, career choices and ambitions.

GCSE Spanish is a linear qualification. Examination will take place in four skill areas of Listening, Reading, Writing and Speaking at the end of Year 11.

GCSE Spanish is demanding and rigorous with a strong emphasis on grammar and accuracy. It is recognised as a challenging and valuable qualification by employers and universities and can open up a variety of career fields such as IT, Teaching, Accountancy, Law, Journalism, Sales and Marketing.

Sports Science

The Sports Science course allows students the opportunity to develop their understanding of the Principles of Training, Nutrition, Bodies Response to Exercise and Sports Injury.

Whilst the course is more sector-based, it also encompasses some core sport/physical education themes.  Students have the opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge about different types of sports related themes.  They will learn about how the body responds to physical activity, fitness testing, sports nutrition, sports injury and rehabilitation, designing fitness programmes and dietary programmes.

The qualification allows for practical and engaging ways of teaching which enables students to:

  • develop a range of skills and fitness through involvement in sport and physical activity in different contexts and roles
  • develop their ability to apply theoretical knowledge to practical situations
  • gain a better understanding of the complexity of different areas of sport and the sports industry. Students develop their depth of understanding through the research and teaching of four main teaching units:

What skills are developed?

  1. Principles of Training
  2. Nutrition
  3. Bodies Response to Exercise
  4. Sports Injury

Methods of assessment.

The course is assessed through 3 internal assignments and 1 one hour written examination.

Support – Non Examination

Students taking the support option will follow a programme of work to support access to other subjects by focussing on literacy and numeracy skills, although the course can be personalised to support the individual needs of a student.

Students doing Support will find that at times it links in with what they are doing in their English and mathematics lessons, but there will be the opportunity to concentrate on particular areas which help learning across the curriculum. There will often be links to topics students are studying in other parts of the curriculum.

Students will be given the opportunity to develop their learning and build up understanding of the skills they need to improve their performance in all areas of the curriculum.

Triple Science

KS3 SCIENCE

The Key Stage 3 Science curriculum has been specifically designed to ensure students are ‘GCSE ready’ by the end of year 8. The topics and practical’s that are included as part of the curriculum, ensure students transition into year 9 equipped with the necessary foundation of scientific knowledge and practical skills.

The main topic areas that are studied as part of the Key Stage 3 Science curriculum include:

Forces

Electromagnets

Energy

Waves

Matter

Reactions

Earth

Organisms

Eco-systems

Genes

Each topic area studied is further sub-divided into 4 topics, with each topic having a specific set of concepts and keywords that students are expected to be able to understand and apply to a range of different contexts.

Assessment in Science across Key Stage 3 takes the form of ‘diagnostic assessments’. These are mini assessments, normally no longer than 30 minutes, given at the end of a topic. The diagnostic assessments are composed of a range of exam style questions and practical questions, used to allow the teacher to identify gaps in knowledge and understanding, which can then be closed following on from the assessment.

There are also 3 larger assessments planned into year 7 and year 8, taking place at the end of each term. These assessments will test a range of content and practical skills from across several topics.

Students following the Triple science course will obtain three separate qualifications in Biology, Chemistry and Physics.

Biology

Students study the science of living organisms (including animals, plants, fungi and microorganisms) and their interactions with each other and the environment. The study of biology involves collecting and interpreting information about the natural world to identify patterns and relate possible cause and effect.

Students will be helped to understand how, through the ideas of biology, the complex and diverse phenomena of the natural world can be described in terms of a small number of key ideas which are of universal application, and which can be illustrated in the separate topics.

These ideas include:

  • life processes depend on molecules whose structure is related to their function
  • the fundamental units of living organisms are cells, which may be part of highly adapted structures including tissues, organs and organ systems, enabling living processes to be performed effectively
  • living organisms may form populations of single species, communities of many species and ecosystems, interacting with each other, with the environment and with humans in many different ways
  • living organisms are interdependent and show adaptations to their environment
  • life on Earth is dependent on photosynthesis in which green plants and algae trap light from the Sun to fix carbon dioxide and combine it with hydrogen from water to make organic compounds and oxygen
  • organic compounds are used as fuels in cellular respiration to allow the other chemical reactions necessary for life
  • the chemicals in ecosystems are continually cycling through the natural world
  • the characteristics of a living organism are influenced by its genome and its interaction with the environment
  • evolution occurs by a process of natural selection and accounts both for biodiversity and how organisms are all related to varying degrees

Chemistry

Students study the science of the composition, structure, properties and reactions of matter, understood in terms of atoms, atomic particles and the way they are arranged and link together. Chemistry is concerned with the synthesis, formulation, analysis and characteristic properties of substances and materials of all kinds.

Students will be helped to appreciate the achievements of chemistry in showing how the complex and diverse phenomena of both the natural and man-made worlds can be described in terms of a small number of key ideas which are of universal application, and which can be illustrated in the separate topics.

These ideas include:

  • matter is composed of tiny particles called atoms and there are about 100 different naturally occurring types of atoms called elements
  • elements show periodic relationships in their chemical and physical properties
  • these periodic properties can be explained in terms of the atomic structure of the elements
  • atoms bond by either transferring electrons from one atom to another or by sharing electrons
  • the shapes of molecules (groups of atoms bonded together) and the way giant structures are arranged is of great importance in terms of the way they behave
  • there are barriers to reaction so reactions occur at different rates
  • chemical reactions take place in only three different ways: proton transfer, electron transfer and electron sharing
  • energy is conserved in chemical reactions so can therefore be neither created or destroyed

Physics

Students study the science of the fundamental concepts of field, force, radiation and particle structures, which are inter-linked to form unified models of the behaviour of the material universe. From such models, a wide range of ideas, from the broadest issue of the development of the universe over time to the numerous and detailed ways in which new technologies may be invented, have emerged.

Students will be helped to understand how, through the ideas of physics, the complex and diverse phenomena of the natural world can be described in terms of a small number of key ideas which are of universal application and which can be illustrated in the separate topics.

These ideas include:

  • the use of models, as in the particle model of matter or the wave models of light and of sound
  • the concept of cause and effect in explaining such links as those between force and acceleration, or between changes in atomic nuclei and radioactive emissions
  • the phenomena of ‘action at a distance’ and the related concept of the field as the key to analysing electrical, magnetic and gravitational effects
  • that differences, for example between pressures or temperatures or electrical potentials, are the drivers of change
  • that proportionality, for example between weight and mass of an object or between force and extension in a spring, is an important aspect of many models in science
  • that physical laws and models are expressed in mathematical form.